card Luverne High School & Middle School Celebrate Veterans Day
card Beaded Bracelets Inspire Middle School Students To Sparkle Locally, Worldwide
 

By: Mavis Fodness
Rock County Star Herald

bracelet

Luverne seventh-grader Mia Wenzel knows the $10 beaded bracelet she purchased two months ago had a positive impact on an African family.

She and 24 other student council members and two adults attended the WE Day conference in late September.

WE Day in the Twin Cities Excel Center celebrates youth making a difference in the local and global communities.

"My mind just exploded," Wenzel said about the conference. "I can do so many things that can have an impact on — and I am just in middle school."

The student council members said they were drawn to the "We Are Rafikis" project after watching a pair of Kenyan warriors at the conference.

Once home, the Luverne students did their own research and concluded selling the Rafiki (Swahili for friend) bracelets would have a positive global impact.

"I know a lot of people in Kenya are starving," said eighth-grader and council member Brodi Oakley.

She purchased a green Rafiki bracelet after the warriors' presentation, knowing her money helped provide food for a Kenyan family.

Oakley said food is one of five pillars talked about at the conference and central to service learning.

Each child needs five pillars in their lives in order to break the cycle of poverty within their families. The other pillars are education, health, opportunity and water.

Wenzel purchased a Rafiki bracelet supporting water. Her support supplied a Kenyan family with 30 days of reliable water source to drink, bathe and cook.

She wears the bracelet of tiny blue beads almost every day as a reminder.

"It reminds me that I helped a kid," she said. "It was just one month but I bet it made a big impact in his life."

On the back of each Rafiki package is a code for the WE.org website to track the donation’s impact.

As the student council conducts the in-school fundraiser, they are also able to expand the fundraiser to the Luverne community due to the free shipping option.

For $10 community members can choose one of 17 different bracelet designs supporting a pillar.

The pillars are separated according to color: blue supports water, red supports health, green supports food, purple supports opportunity and tan supports education.

Order forms can be found on the Luverne Middle School's Facebook page. Checks to LMS and the order form can be dropped off at the middle/high school office.

Deadline for ordering is Thursday, Dec. 8. Orders may take three weeks to arrive.

The rafiki bracelets are made out of 48-inch stretchy cord thread and the colorful glass beads. They are assembled by Kenyan artisans and can also be worn as a necklace, anklet bracelet or headband.

Half of the $10 cost goes directly to a Kenyan family and the other half goes toward the LMS WE Act campaign.

This year the students chose to donate money toward health care for residents in Haiti.

Last year the students focused on the education pillar for Haitian children.

For more information contact student council adviser Becky Rahm at LMS, 507-283-4491, or by email b.rahm@isd2184.org.

Earlier this year the council's We Act campaign conducted a local food drive, challenging the Pipestone middle school students to donate food to their local food shelves.

The friendly competition raised more than 1,000 items between the Luverne and Pipestone food banks.

"They were very much appreciated," Rahm shared on the LMS Facebook page.

card Four Luverne Seniors Part of Unique Character-Building Project
 

By: Mavis Fodness
Rock County Star Herald

polished stone

Luverne students will soon carry polished stones in their pockets as reminders to make good decisions on social media and the Internet.

The stones are part of the Polished Stone Project to be introduced to Luverne fourth- through eighth-grade students.

Four local seniors have been selected to assist with various aspects of the project.

Coordinator Philip Olson of Sioux Falls leads assemblies to demonstrate ways to make better online decisions. Afterward, each student receives a small polished stone.

"The polished stones are a reminder to students to strive to make decisions that help them polish their character instead of making decisions that could leave them rough around the edges," Olson stated.

A few weeks ago he and the Luverne seniors created a five-minute introduction to the project's main video message Bergin Flom, Hailey Franken, Knute Oldre and Logan Stratton were chosen based on their involvement in different school activities as well as being good role models for younger students, according to high school counselor Amy Cook.

"The big thing about this project is making students aware of the Internet, what is out there and what it can mean to students," she said. "Even at a young age students are using technology - this will help educate them to be safer with their use."

Through watching the finished video and interacting with the older students, the fourth- through eighth-graders will learn good choices and proper use of technology.

"It's a good message to spread to younger kids," said senior Knute Oldre.

The Luverne students spent 30 minutes with videographer Olson, in completing the introduction.

The students play catch with a football and later talk at a picnic table. They watch a video on a cell phone as the scene transitions to the Polished Stone Project's message.

The students said they enjoyed their film session, but it wasn't without its difficulties.

"It took me a couple of takes for three words," admitted Stratton. Both girls said they had to speak louder into their microphones.

The student assemblies will take place later this year.




ISD 2184 Radio News

Superintendent: Craig Oftedahl


HS/MS Principal: Ryan Johnson


Elementary Principal: Stacy Gillette


Community Education Director: Karen Willers



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